Nazi and Allied bombing campaigns morally equivalent, according to Zinn

 

This is an excerpt from a review of Zinn’s book by Stanford University Education Professor Sam Wineburg:

In his lead-up to a discussion of the atomic bomb, Zinn makes this claim: “At the start of World War II German planes dropped bombs on Rotterdam in Holland, Coventry in England, and elsewhere. Roosevelt had described these as ‘inhuman barbarism that has profoundly shocked the conscience of humanity.’”[1] Zinn then adds: “These German bombings [of Rotterdam and Coventry] were very small compared with the British and American bombings of German cities.”[2] He then lists the names of some of the most devastating Allied bombing campaigns, including the most notorious, the firebombing of Dresden.

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Zinn Claims Blacks Didn’t Care if the Nazi’s Won WWII

This is an excerpt from a review of Zinn’s book by Stanford University Education Professor Sam Wineburg:

Consider the question of whether World War II was a “people’s war.” On one level, as Zinn has to admit, it was. Thousands suited up in uniform, and millions handed over hard-earned dollars to buy war bonds. But Zinn asks us to consider whether such support was “manufactured.” Was there, in fact, widespread resentment and resistance to the war that was hidden from the masses?

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America is just as bad as Nazi Germany, according to Howard Zinn

In Chapter 16 of A People’s History of the United States, the book’s author, Howard Zinn, uses leading questions and misleading phrases to suggest to readers that the United States not only refused to condemn the Holocaust, but that the United States in the 1930s may have been responsible for even greater evil than Hitler’s Germany.

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