SJW Teachers Violate Curriculum Standards and Lie to Parents

Curriculum wars have gripped the education industry and the popular psyche in America for decades. The battles over sex education. Evolution versus creationism. Progressive educators with their revisionist history lessons versus the traditionalists pushing civic virtues and founding principles. And the list goes on.

But what happens when curriculum doesn’t matter. What happens when the school boards are out of session, the parents are at work, and it’s just the students and teachers? What happens when teachers teach whatever they want, the curriculum standards be damned?

This is the state of education in America. Teachers are adopting social justice lesson plans even when doing so violates curriculum standards, the desires of parents, and – most importantly – the best interests of students.

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Zinn on the greed of Columbus and the altruism of the natives

In a 700 page book, Zinn spends about a half dozen pages on Columbus’ four voyages, but he manages to pack a lot of nonsense into those few pages.

Here we will look at Zinn’s treatment of the native populations of the new world with whom Columbus first made contact. While Zinn is careful to use many of Columbus’ own words, the slicing and dicing and re-contextualizing paints a misleadingly black and white portrait – that of naiveté, sincerity, and generosity on the part of the natives, and greed and thuggishness on the part of Columbus and his men.

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Nazi and Allied bombing campaigns morally equivalent, according to Zinn

 

This is an excerpt from a review of Zinn’s book by Stanford University Education Professor Sam Wineburg:

In his lead-up to a discussion of the atomic bomb, Zinn makes this claim: “At the start of World War II German planes dropped bombs on Rotterdam in Holland, Coventry in England, and elsewhere. Roosevelt had described these as ‘inhuman barbarism that has profoundly shocked the conscience of humanity.’”[1] Zinn then adds: “These German bombings [of Rotterdam and Coventry] were very small compared with the British and American bombings of German cities.”[2] He then lists the names of some of the most devastating Allied bombing campaigns, including the most notorious, the firebombing of Dresden.

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Zinn Claims Blacks Didn’t Care if the Nazi’s Won WWII

This is an excerpt from a review of Zinn’s book by Stanford University Education Professor Sam Wineburg:

Consider the question of whether World War II was a “people’s war.” On one level, as Zinn has to admit, it was. Thousands suited up in uniform, and millions handed over hard-earned dollars to buy war bonds. But Zinn asks us to consider whether such support was “manufactured.” Was there, in fact, widespread resentment and resistance to the war that was hidden from the masses?

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